The Commonwealth Government has welcomed the arrival of the Carillon’s new G Bell, known as the ‘Ngunnawal’ Bell. The enormous G Bell, weighing in at over 5 tonne, was transported from the UK on a RAAF-C17 in time for the Carillion’s 50th Anniversary. The Bell will be one of the largest bells within the tower and will add the missing G note to the repertoire of music.

Inscribed within the bell are the words:

YUMALUNDI DHAWURA NGUNNAWALNGU NGANAA
GURALILI YARABI DHAWURA MANAGAY.
WELCOME TO NGUNNAWAL COUNTRY
YOU MAY LEAVE YOUR FOOTPRINTS ON OUR LAND.

Aunty Roslyn Brown was onsite to welcome the new bell.

“This is a really special occasion with the inscription included within the bell. Having this new bell ceremonially welcomed is really singing to our spirit as Canberra’s traditional custodians,” said Aunty Roslyn Brown, Ngunnawal Elder.

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank not only the Ngunnawal Elders who welcomed the bell yesterday morning, but also to thank the RAAF for bringing the bell to its new home at the National Carillon,” said the Hon Nola Marino, Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories.

“The arrival of the Bell provides a major milestone to the works currently underway for the Carillon’s 50th Birthday on 26 April 2020,” Assistant Minister Marino said.

“The 50 year anniversary of the Carillion will really make Aspen Island a destination where visitors and Canberrans can listen to the music from a serene world class setting,” Senator for the ACT, Zed Seselja said.

“The Liberal-National Government is committed to ensuring the Canberra economy thrives by investing in projects to attract visitors to our city with the new Bell unveiled today in the Carillion along Lake Burley Griffin, and significant investments announced over the past two years in our institutions, including $63 million for the National Gallery and a $500 million investment in the Australian War Memorial,” Senator Seselja said.

Senior Carillonist Dr Thomas Laue, explained that the addition of this bell is a critical one to enhance the sound of the National Carillon.

“The addition of the Ngunnawal Bell and the smaller D Bell will mean the Canberra Carillonist will no longer have to adjust music to accommodate the missing notes.”

“With a number of Carillonists representing not only Canberra but Australia Internationally, the additional bells will align with international Carillon standards. This will provide our Carillonists with a better playing
experience and promote our Carillonists to the world stage,” said Dr Laue.